January 16, 2014

 

FOR IMMEDIATE PRESS RELEASE 

Press contact Carol Parkinson 212-431-1130 x 120

HARVESTWORKS DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS CENTER

596 Broadway Suite 602 N.Y. NY 10012 (btw: Prince and Houston)

Phone: 212-431-1130 x 120 (e) carolp@harvestworks.org

 

 

Harvestworks partners with the Composers Now Festival to present

 “Nature and Numbers in New Music”, an evening with composers Tom Hamilton and Liz Phillips to see and hear about their use of data in composing contemporary music.

7 – 9 pm

February 18, 2014

 

Harvestworks will present a “behind the scenes” look at how algorithmic systems and data inspire and shape new music by these contemporary sound art and experimental music composers.  It will feature presentations by the composers followed by a panel discussion.  This is an all-ages event.

 

Composer and interactive artist Liz Phillips with Butoh Dancer Mariko Endo Reynolds will perform a short version that shows how their collaborative work “Biyuu” activates the body’s potential energy fields with dynamic and radical events in nature—bamboo, tall reeds and water.  Our behind the scenes look will include a new video document of the performances of “Biyuu” by video artist Mary Lucier and a demonstration of Phillips’ system where Mariko’s body becomes an antenna that interacts with the 3-D sound and video performance landscape.

 

The short performance will be followed by Tom Hamilton’s “London Fix (music changing with the price of gold)” an 8 channel composition created specifically for loudspeakers and presented in a darkened room to facilitate a superior listening experience.

 

“London Fix” follows the contours of the spot gold market as defined by the twice-daily London Fix. The composer used price charts to animate an electronic pitch-making system of his own design, mapping the charts to control individual pitch possibilities, range, and portamento. He used the historical chart data both in a linear and recursive fashion, resulting in sonic fluctuations that compress and superimpose time in a way that discourages any literal interpretation.   The CD recording of London Fix was released by Muse-Eek Publications, and was awarded an Honorary Mention in the 2004 Prix Ars Electronica; one of ten in a field of over 600 entries.  London Fix was first presented at CCNOA in Brussels, as part of the 2003 Earwitness series. More information at: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/thamilton

 

About the Composers

New York-based artist LIZ PHILLIPS has been making interactive multi-media installations for the past 40 years. She creates responsive environments sensing wind, plants, fish, audience, dance, water, and food. Audio and visual art forms combine with new technologies to create elastic time-space constructs. Sound is the primary descriptive material.  Since 2000 many of her installations have employed multiple human-scale video projections. Phillips has exhibited at The Milwaukee Art Museum, Queens Museum of Art, The Jewish Museum, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Spoleto Festival USA, the Walker Art Center, Lincoln Center Festival, Ars Electronica, Jacob’s Pillow, The Kitchen, Rene Block Gallery and Frederieke Taylor Gallery. Phillips has collaborated with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Nam June Paik, Alison Knowles, Yoshi Wada, Earl Howard, Simone Forti and Robert Kovich.  Phillips received fellowships and grants including a Guggenheim Fellowship (1987), commissions from New York State Council on the Arts and National Endowment for the Arts. Phillips teaches workshops and lectures on Sound and Interactive Media, now at Purchase College. In the last ten years she has curated several exhibitions of emerging artists and women making installations with sound.

Mariko Endo is a professional Japanese Butoh Dancer, a student of Akira Kasai, one of the co-founders of the Butoh movement.  She toured Japan and the United States as a principal dancer in one of Japan’s representative Butoh companies, Dairakudakan.  In addition to her foundation of dance, she has studied anthropology and energy healing, all which influence her approach to dance as a sculpture of consciousness.

Mary Lucier, video documentation editor and camera, is celebrated for her contributions to the form of multi-monitor, multi-channel video installation. She attended Brandeis University, originally working in sculpture, photography, and performance before concentrating on video installation in the 1970s. In her work–from Ohio At Giverny to The Plains of Sweet Regret and Wisconsin Arc– she has explored the theme of landscape as a metaphor for loss and regeneration and, more recently, trauma as experienced and articulated in more narrative modes. Current projects are concerned with the Buddhist nuns and convents in Kyoto and Nara, Japan, and the Dakota Sioux on the Spirit Lake Reservation. She has been the recipient of the Guggenheim Foundation, Creative Capital, USA Artists, and the Japan-US Friendship Commission, as well as the Skowhegan Award for Video  and the AICA Best Video Show Award.  She is represented by Lennon, Weinberg, Inc., NY; her tapes are distributed by Electronic Arts Intermix.

 

TOM HAMILTON has composed and performed electronic music for over 40 years, and his work with electronic music originated in the late-60s era of analog synthesis.  Hamilton was a 2005 Fellow of the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, participating in a residency at the foundation’s center in Umbria. Hamilton’s performing and recording colleagues have included Peter Zummo, Bruce Gremo, Karlheinz Essl, Bruce Arnold, Bruce Eisenbeil, Rich O’Donnell, Thomas Buckner, Al Margolis, and id m theft able, and he has worked with Composers Inside Electronics.  Hamilton has released 15 CDs of his music; his CD London Fix received an award in the Prix Ars Electronica, and a 2 CD set of his electronic music of the 1970s was named one of The Wire’s Top 50 Reissues of 2010. Hamilton was the co-director of the 2004 Sounds Like Now festival, and he co-produced the Cooler in the Shade/Warmer by the Stove new music series for 14 years.  Since 1990, Hamilton has been a member of composer Robert Ashley‘s touring opera ensemble, performing sound processing and mixing in both recordings and concerts. His audio production can be found in over 60 CD releases of new and experimental music.

 

About Harvestworks  Our mission is to present experimental sound and visual artworks created in collaboration with our Technology, Engineering, Art and Music (TEAM) Lab. The Harvestworks T.E.A.M Lab supports the creation of art works achieved through the use of new and evolving technologies and provides an environment for experimentation with project consultants, technicians, instructors and innovative practitioners in all branchs of the electronic arts. Our programs are made possible with funds from New York State Council on the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, the NYC Dept. of Cultural Affairs, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, mediaThe foundation, Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Materials for the Arts, Jerome Foundation, the Edwards Foundation Arts Fund, Bloomberg Philanthropies and the Friends of Harvestworks.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

ROULETTE PRESENTS

INTERACTIVE SOUND INSTALLATION ART PIONEER

 LIZ PHILLIPS

“BIYUU”

FEATURING BUTOH DANCER MARIKO ENDO REYNOLDS

JUNE 2ND AND 3RD AT 8PM AT 509 ATLANTIC AVENUE,
BROOKLYN, NY 11217

 

 

 

Liz Phillips explores the body electric, ground, and tides to reveal a fragile ecosystem. In this performance, titled  “Biyuu” (a Japanese word which mimics the sound of bamboo bending in the wind) Phillips teams up with Butoh Dancer, Mariko Endo Reynolds. Their investigation of the body in both potential energy fields and in nature—bamboo, tall reeds and water (recorded at the Edith Read Sanctuary) will be brought to the stage.

On the tuned stage Mariko’s body will become an antenna as she shifts shape, moving near ground and reaching out.  Her body will act as a conductor and the space around her will be activated, creating sound responses.  Phillips will translate, transpose and shift spectrums, activating water, sound and color formations as the projections fall on translucent paper scrims and the weather balloon. The paper will act sometimes as the loudspeaker, at other times as a sensor. As Mariko performs, she will move the weather balloon to capture images and transform the stage. Seen and unseen waves of water, sub audio, audio, radio frequency, ultrasonic and light will become tactile material as Liz creates a hypersensitive 3D sound and video installation which reinvents the performance landscape.

This project has been funded by many individuals through USA Projects, Parabola Arts Foundation, the David Bermant Foundation and Roulette.

Liz Phillips

New York-based artist Liz Phillips has been making interactive multi-media installations for the past 40 years. She creates responsive environments sensing wind, plants, fish, audience, dance, water, and food. Audio and visual art forms combine with new technologies to create elastic time-space constructs. Sound is the primary descriptive material.  Since 2000 many of her installations such as “Shaded Bandwidths” and “Echo-Location: Queens” have employed multiple human-scale video projections.

Phillips has exhibited at museums, alternative spaces, festivals, and public spaces including The Milwaukee Art Museum, Queens Museum of Art, The Jewish Museum, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Spoleto Festival USA, the Walker Art Center, Lincoln Center Festival, Ars Electronica, Jacob’s Pillow, The Kitchen, Rene Block Gallery and Frederieke Taylor Gallery. Public spaces as diverse as an alternative energy site in a wind turbine (1981) in the South Bronx , the anchorage under the Brooklyn Bridge (2001), Peavy Plaza in Minneapolis and Art Park in Lewiston NY have all been the locations of site specific installations. Phillips has collaborated with the Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Nam June Paik, Alison Knowles, Yoshi Wada, Earl Howard, Simone Forti and Robert Kovich.  Her work was presented by Creative Time, the Cleveland Orchestra, IBM Japan, and the World Financial Center. Phillips received fellowships and grants including a Guggenheim Fellowship (1987), commissions from New York State Council on the Arts and National Endowment for the Arts. Phillips teaches workshops and lectures on Sound and Interactive Media, now at Purchase College. In the last ten years she has curated several exhibitions of emerging artists and women making installations with sound.

 

Mariko Endo Reynolds 

Mariko Endo Reynolds is a professional Japanese Butoh Dancer who trained in Tokyo with Akira Kasai, one of the co-founders of the Butoh movement.  She toured Japan and the United States as a principal dancer in one of Japan’s representative Butoh companies, Dairakudakan.  In addition to her foundation of dance, she has studied anthropology and energy healing, all which influence her approach to dance as a sculpture of consciousness.  Since moving to New York she has been active in many Butoh dance and multi-media projects. She is teaching Butohin Tanua Calamoneri’s Company SoGono Butoh Workshop.

 

For more information on Roulette Brooklyn:

509 Atlantic Ave (corner of Atlantic and 3rd Aves in downtown Brooklyn) 2, 3, 4, 5, C, G, D, M, N, R, B & Q trains and the LIRR

General admission: $15 / $10 Roulette Members, Students, Seniors

Tickets can be purchased online:  www.roulette.org

Archived News

Previous News posts from the old site:

PELHAM ART CENTER

2011-07-05

Spectral Reservoir / Sea Sounding Pellham Art Center 2011

This new installation uses a wavetable, water and sound to amplifiy the waves of activity from the sea and in the gallery. An open electronic sampling and synthesis system is custom made to run this installation. The sound material is gathered from live microphone transmissions and digital field recordings. Sounds and waves are resonated and mixed by real time activity in the gallery space. The audience can be both engaged and immersed in the time and space specific construct and the investigation and accumulation of unseen waves.

STUDENT WORKSHOPS / YOUTUBE

2009-02-05

See images from student workshops from the last several years hereLiz has set up an account on Youtube

RECENT SHOWS

2008-12-23

Recently Liz exhibited work in shows at the Milwaukee Art Museum and The Nelson Gallery at UC Davis. Her one person show “Ginko Afterglow” was on view at the Safe-T-Gallery in Brooklyn.See images from the Brooklyn and Milwaukee shows here

Safe-T-Gallery
UC Davis
Milwaukee Art Museum

FROM THE PERCEPTION LAB: SOUND SHOW

2005-09-16

Liz has curated an exhibition of artwork by current and former students entitled From the Perception Lab: Sound Show, on view at the Pelham Art Center through October 22nd, 2005.From the Westchester Journal News:

If you walk by the Pelham Art Center tomorrow night, you just might see a rooster pecking around in the courtyard, admiring his reflection as he generates his own unique sound.

Why is a microphone-equipped chicken coop in a place that celebrates art? If the rooster could talk, he’d answer that question himself: It is art.

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” opening tomorrow with a reception and an all-age art workshop, explores the world of sound art with a variety of indoor and outdoor installations created, for the most part, by students at Purchase College. The exhibit is curated by sound artist Liz Phillips, who teaches at Purchase and whose own works have been displayed at the Whitney.

What distinguishes a sound art exhibition from a display of traditional art works?

“Sound is really the primary carrier of the information in each of the pieces,” says Denise Mullen, dean of the School of Art and Design at Purchase College. “They’re using sound as traditional Renaissance painters would use paint and canvas.”

Each piece is designed to be examined closely – and touched. “We want it to be opposite of a science museum,” says Phillips, who spent days setting up the exhibition with one of her students, John McCormick. “Here we’re hoping people will really listen, look and experience more of an observational science – how their actual physical presence shifts sounds.”

Works on display include an installation by Cal Lane featuring dangling rolls of toilet paper accompanied by the sound of running water; a step-in sound-generating steel-and-wood sculpture by Melissa Skluzacek; and a piece by McCormick that uses a Coke bottle, a microphone, bubbling water and two radios to generate a mix of sounds. There is also the wildly inventive Harmonic Generator, an electronic instrument created by Isaac Zal Sprachman that has motorized paint brushes hitting piano strings, emitting a sound that is fed back through a transducer (and described, by the artist on his Web site, as “a symphony inside the belly of a whale”).

Transducers and a variety of high-tech devices figure largely in the exhibition. But even though Mullen believes technological advances have sped along the development of sound art, particularly over the past 20 years, Phillips has made it her medium of choice for more than three decades.

“I like the tactile nature of sound in space, and the way if fills space,” says Phillips, who lives in Queens. “It’s a very tangible material. You can make it come and go.”

For Fabio Ernesto Corredor, who recently won the prestigious SUNY Thayer Fellowship for one of his pieces – and whose live-rooster installation was inspired by his grandfather’s fondness for cock fighting in Colombia – modern technology has opened up a world of possibility.

Now a piece of that world is making a stop in Pelham.

“This is really an ambitious show … a unique show regionally and nationally,” says Pelham Art Center director Lisa Robb. “You may be thinking less of visual beauty, but the whole multisensory experience should be fun. It will offer audiences something new. Anyone who loves gadgets and gizmos, this is the show.”

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” curated by Liz Phillips, opens at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 9 with a reception and an all-age art workshop with Suzuko Davis. Free. On the exhibit’s last day, Oct. 22, the Pelham Art Center will host “Sound Off,” an afternoon of workshops and talks. Major funding for the exhibit was received from the David Bermant Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts. Regular gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is always free. 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham. 914-738-2525 or www.pelhamartcenter.org.

UCSD INTERMEDIA FESTIVAL

2005-06-28

Liz presented work at UC San Diego’s Intermedia Festival in early June. Link

NEW MATERIAL

2005-02-28

The projects page is still under development. In the meantime, some new material is available:Image slideshow from Echo Location, recently on view at the Queens International, 2004 at the Queens Museum of Art. Link opens in new window.

Quicktime clip of the Echo Location installation:
Streaming; low resolution
Not streaming; higher resolution. 11MB
Clip Credit: CJ Cartiglia

PELHAM ART CENTER

2011-07-05

Spectral Reservoir / Sea Sounding Pellham Art Center 2011

This new installation uses a wavetable, water and sound to amplifiy the waves of activity from the sea and in the gallery. An open electronic sampling and synthesis system is custom made to run this installation. The sound material is gathered from live microphone transmissions and digital field recordings. Sounds and waves are resonated and mixed by real time activity in the gallery space. The audience can be both engaged and immersed in the time and space specific construct and the investigation and accumulation of unseen waves.

STUDENT WORKSHOPS / YOUTUBE

2009-02-05

See images from student workshops from the last several years hereLiz has set up an account on Youtube

RECENT SHOWS

2008-12-23

Recently Liz exhibited work in shows at the Milwaukee Art Museum and The Nelson Gallery at UC Davis. Her one person show “Ginko Afterglow” was on view at the Safe-T-Gallery in Brooklyn.See images from the Brooklyn and Milwaukee shows here

Safe-T-Gallery
UC Davis
Milwaukee Art Museum

FROM THE PERCEPTION LAB: SOUND SHOW

2005-09-16

Liz has curated an exhibition of artwork by current and former students entitled From the Perception Lab: Sound Show, on view at the Pelham Art Center through October 22nd, 2005.From the Westchester Journal News:

If you walk by the Pelham Art Center tomorrow night, you just might see a rooster pecking around in the courtyard, admiring his reflection as he generates his own unique sound.

Why is a microphone-equipped chicken coop in a place that celebrates art? If the rooster could talk, he’d answer that question himself: It is art.

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” opening tomorrow with a reception and an all-age art workshop, explores the world of sound art with a variety of indoor and outdoor installations created, for the most part, by students at Purchase College. The exhibit is curated by sound artist Liz Phillips, who teaches at Purchase and whose own works have been displayed at the Whitney.

What distinguishes a sound art exhibition from a display of traditional art works?

“Sound is really the primary carrier of the information in each of the pieces,” says Denise Mullen, dean of the School of Art and Design at Purchase College. “They’re using sound as traditional Renaissance painters would use paint and canvas.”

Each piece is designed to be examined closely – and touched. “We want it to be opposite of a science museum,” says Phillips, who spent days setting up the exhibition with one of her students, John McCormick. “Here we’re hoping people will really listen, look and experience more of an observational science – how their actual physical presence shifts sounds.”

Works on display include an installation by Cal Lane featuring dangling rolls of toilet paper accompanied by the sound of running water; a step-in sound-generating steel-and-wood sculpture by Melissa Skluzacek; and a piece by McCormick that uses a Coke bottle, a microphone, bubbling water and two radios to generate a mix of sounds. There is also the wildly inventive Harmonic Generator, an electronic instrument created by Isaac Zal Sprachman that has motorized paint brushes hitting piano strings, emitting a sound that is fed back through a transducer (and described, by the artist on his Web site, as “a symphony inside the belly of a whale”).

Transducers and a variety of high-tech devices figure largely in the exhibition. But even though Mullen believes technological advances have sped along the development of sound art, particularly over the past 20 years, Phillips has made it her medium of choice for more than three decades.

“I like the tactile nature of sound in space, and the way if fills space,” says Phillips, who lives in Queens. “It’s a very tangible material. You can make it come and go.”

For Fabio Ernesto Corredor, who recently won the prestigious SUNY Thayer Fellowship for one of his pieces – and whose live-rooster installation was inspired by his grandfather’s fondness for cock fighting in Colombia – modern technology has opened up a world of possibility.

Now a piece of that world is making a stop in Pelham.

“This is really an ambitious show … a unique show regionally and nationally,” says Pelham Art Center director Lisa Robb. “You may be thinking less of visual beauty, but the whole multisensory experience should be fun. It will offer audiences something new. Anyone who loves gadgets and gizmos, this is the show.”

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” curated by Liz Phillips, opens at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 9 with a reception and an all-age art workshop with Suzuko Davis. Free. On the exhibit’s last day, Oct. 22, the Pelham Art Center will host “Sound Off,” an afternoon of workshops and talks. Major funding for the exhibit was received from the David Bermant Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts. Regular gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is always free. 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham. 914-738-2525 or www.pelhamartcenter.org.

UCSD INTERMEDIA FESTIVAL

2005-06-28

Liz presented work at UC San Diego’s Intermedia Festival in early June. Link

NEW MATERIAL

2005-02-28

The projects page is still under development. In the meantime, some new material is available:Image slideshow from Echo Location, recently on view at the Queens International, 2004 at the Queens Museum of Art. Link opens in new window.

Quicktime clip of the Echo Location installation:
Streaming; low resolution
Not streaming; higher resolution. 11MB
Clip Credit: CJ Cartiglia