Archived News

Previous News posts from the old site:

PELHAM ART CENTER

2011-07-05

Spectral Reservoir / Sea Sounding Pellham Art Center 2011

This new installation uses a wavetable, water and sound to amplifiy the waves of activity from the sea and in the gallery. An open electronic sampling and synthesis system is custom made to run this installation. The sound material is gathered from live microphone transmissions and digital field recordings. Sounds and waves are resonated and mixed by real time activity in the gallery space. The audience can be both engaged and immersed in the time and space specific construct and the investigation and accumulation of unseen waves.

STUDENT WORKSHOPS / YOUTUBE

2009-02-05

See images from student workshops from the last several years hereLiz has set up an account on Youtube

RECENT SHOWS

2008-12-23

Recently Liz exhibited work in shows at the Milwaukee Art Museum and The Nelson Gallery at UC Davis. Her one person show “Ginko Afterglow” was on view at the Safe-T-Gallery in Brooklyn.See images from the Brooklyn and Milwaukee shows here

Safe-T-Gallery
UC Davis
Milwaukee Art Museum

FROM THE PERCEPTION LAB: SOUND SHOW

2005-09-16

Liz has curated an exhibition of artwork by current and former students entitled From the Perception Lab: Sound Show, on view at the Pelham Art Center through October 22nd, 2005.From the Westchester Journal News:

If you walk by the Pelham Art Center tomorrow night, you just might see a rooster pecking around in the courtyard, admiring his reflection as he generates his own unique sound.

Why is a microphone-equipped chicken coop in a place that celebrates art? If the rooster could talk, he’d answer that question himself: It is art.

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” opening tomorrow with a reception and an all-age art workshop, explores the world of sound art with a variety of indoor and outdoor installations created, for the most part, by students at Purchase College. The exhibit is curated by sound artist Liz Phillips, who teaches at Purchase and whose own works have been displayed at the Whitney.

What distinguishes a sound art exhibition from a display of traditional art works?

“Sound is really the primary carrier of the information in each of the pieces,” says Denise Mullen, dean of the School of Art and Design at Purchase College. “They’re using sound as traditional Renaissance painters would use paint and canvas.”

Each piece is designed to be examined closely – and touched. “We want it to be opposite of a science museum,” says Phillips, who spent days setting up the exhibition with one of her students, John McCormick. “Here we’re hoping people will really listen, look and experience more of an observational science – how their actual physical presence shifts sounds.”

Works on display include an installation by Cal Lane featuring dangling rolls of toilet paper accompanied by the sound of running water; a step-in sound-generating steel-and-wood sculpture by Melissa Skluzacek; and a piece by McCormick that uses a Coke bottle, a microphone, bubbling water and two radios to generate a mix of sounds. There is also the wildly inventive Harmonic Generator, an electronic instrument created by Isaac Zal Sprachman that has motorized paint brushes hitting piano strings, emitting a sound that is fed back through a transducer (and described, by the artist on his Web site, as “a symphony inside the belly of a whale”).

Transducers and a variety of high-tech devices figure largely in the exhibition. But even though Mullen believes technological advances have sped along the development of sound art, particularly over the past 20 years, Phillips has made it her medium of choice for more than three decades.

“I like the tactile nature of sound in space, and the way if fills space,” says Phillips, who lives in Queens. “It’s a very tangible material. You can make it come and go.”

For Fabio Ernesto Corredor, who recently won the prestigious SUNY Thayer Fellowship for one of his pieces – and whose live-rooster installation was inspired by his grandfather’s fondness for cock fighting in Colombia – modern technology has opened up a world of possibility.

Now a piece of that world is making a stop in Pelham.

“This is really an ambitious show … a unique show regionally and nationally,” says Pelham Art Center director Lisa Robb. “You may be thinking less of visual beauty, but the whole multisensory experience should be fun. It will offer audiences something new. Anyone who loves gadgets and gizmos, this is the show.”

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” curated by Liz Phillips, opens at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 9 with a reception and an all-age art workshop with Suzuko Davis. Free. On the exhibit’s last day, Oct. 22, the Pelham Art Center will host “Sound Off,” an afternoon of workshops and talks. Major funding for the exhibit was received from the David Bermant Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts. Regular gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is always free. 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham. 914-738-2525 or www.pelhamartcenter.org.

UCSD INTERMEDIA FESTIVAL

2005-06-28

Liz presented work at UC San Diego’s Intermedia Festival in early June. Link

NEW MATERIAL

2005-02-28

The projects page is still under development. In the meantime, some new material is available:Image slideshow from Echo Location, recently on view at the Queens International, 2004 at the Queens Museum of Art. Link opens in new window.

Quicktime clip of the Echo Location installation:
Streaming; low resolution
Not streaming; higher resolution. 11MB
Clip Credit: CJ Cartiglia

PELHAM ART CENTER

2011-07-05

Spectral Reservoir / Sea Sounding Pellham Art Center 2011

This new installation uses a wavetable, water and sound to amplifiy the waves of activity from the sea and in the gallery. An open electronic sampling and synthesis system is custom made to run this installation. The sound material is gathered from live microphone transmissions and digital field recordings. Sounds and waves are resonated and mixed by real time activity in the gallery space. The audience can be both engaged and immersed in the time and space specific construct and the investigation and accumulation of unseen waves.

STUDENT WORKSHOPS / YOUTUBE

2009-02-05

See images from student workshops from the last several years hereLiz has set up an account on Youtube

RECENT SHOWS

2008-12-23

Recently Liz exhibited work in shows at the Milwaukee Art Museum and The Nelson Gallery at UC Davis. Her one person show “Ginko Afterglow” was on view at the Safe-T-Gallery in Brooklyn.See images from the Brooklyn and Milwaukee shows here

Safe-T-Gallery
UC Davis
Milwaukee Art Museum

FROM THE PERCEPTION LAB: SOUND SHOW

2005-09-16

Liz has curated an exhibition of artwork by current and former students entitled From the Perception Lab: Sound Show, on view at the Pelham Art Center through October 22nd, 2005.From the Westchester Journal News:

If you walk by the Pelham Art Center tomorrow night, you just might see a rooster pecking around in the courtyard, admiring his reflection as he generates his own unique sound.

Why is a microphone-equipped chicken coop in a place that celebrates art? If the rooster could talk, he’d answer that question himself: It is art.

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” opening tomorrow with a reception and an all-age art workshop, explores the world of sound art with a variety of indoor and outdoor installations created, for the most part, by students at Purchase College. The exhibit is curated by sound artist Liz Phillips, who teaches at Purchase and whose own works have been displayed at the Whitney.

What distinguishes a sound art exhibition from a display of traditional art works?

“Sound is really the primary carrier of the information in each of the pieces,” says Denise Mullen, dean of the School of Art and Design at Purchase College. “They’re using sound as traditional Renaissance painters would use paint and canvas.”

Each piece is designed to be examined closely – and touched. “We want it to be opposite of a science museum,” says Phillips, who spent days setting up the exhibition with one of her students, John McCormick. “Here we’re hoping people will really listen, look and experience more of an observational science – how their actual physical presence shifts sounds.”

Works on display include an installation by Cal Lane featuring dangling rolls of toilet paper accompanied by the sound of running water; a step-in sound-generating steel-and-wood sculpture by Melissa Skluzacek; and a piece by McCormick that uses a Coke bottle, a microphone, bubbling water and two radios to generate a mix of sounds. There is also the wildly inventive Harmonic Generator, an electronic instrument created by Isaac Zal Sprachman that has motorized paint brushes hitting piano strings, emitting a sound that is fed back through a transducer (and described, by the artist on his Web site, as “a symphony inside the belly of a whale”).

Transducers and a variety of high-tech devices figure largely in the exhibition. But even though Mullen believes technological advances have sped along the development of sound art, particularly over the past 20 years, Phillips has made it her medium of choice for more than three decades.

“I like the tactile nature of sound in space, and the way if fills space,” says Phillips, who lives in Queens. “It’s a very tangible material. You can make it come and go.”

For Fabio Ernesto Corredor, who recently won the prestigious SUNY Thayer Fellowship for one of his pieces – and whose live-rooster installation was inspired by his grandfather’s fondness for cock fighting in Colombia – modern technology has opened up a world of possibility.

Now a piece of that world is making a stop in Pelham.

“This is really an ambitious show … a unique show regionally and nationally,” says Pelham Art Center director Lisa Robb. “You may be thinking less of visual beauty, but the whole multisensory experience should be fun. It will offer audiences something new. Anyone who loves gadgets and gizmos, this is the show.”

“From the Perception Lab: Sound Show,” curated by Liz Phillips, opens at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 9 with a reception and an all-age art workshop with Suzuko Davis. Free. On the exhibit’s last day, Oct. 22, the Pelham Art Center will host “Sound Off,” an afternoon of workshops and talks. Major funding for the exhibit was received from the David Bermant Foundation and the New York State Council on the Arts. Regular gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is always free. 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham. 914-738-2525 or www.pelhamartcenter.org.

UCSD INTERMEDIA FESTIVAL

2005-06-28

Liz presented work at UC San Diego’s Intermedia Festival in early June. Link

NEW MATERIAL

2005-02-28

The projects page is still under development. In the meantime, some new material is available:Image slideshow from Echo Location, recently on view at the Queens International, 2004 at the Queens Museum of Art. Link opens in new window.

Quicktime clip of the Echo Location installation:
Streaming; low resolution
Not streaming; higher resolution. 11MB
Clip Credit: CJ Cartiglia